Running when you’re SICK….

Well. This is awkward..i haven’t blogged since Thursday…I don’t even know who I am right now!! Please forgive me!

happy weekend to you all! this week has been a strange one for me sine I have had my first cold in over five years! I really had no motivation to do anything at all, never mind being able to blog!

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I came back to life yesterday and I was able to go for a nice easy run of seven miles. I am going to do another easy run later this morning. I’m a little bummed that I got sick since I had originally planned on running the Manchester Marathon this weekend.

I don’t want to make myself any sicker because….Once upon a time, I was deep in training mode when I came down with a common cold. I kept on running, pushing myself like every marathoner chasing a PR is known to do. A month later, the cold I couldn’t shake turned into bronchitis, with pneumonia like symptoms. I had to halt running for two weeks. And the worst part was-I had to miss the Marine Corp Marathon. 😦 I was so bummed-but if I had just taken a couple of days off in the beginning-I probably would been saying adios to it within just a couple of days.

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Nobody likes having to take days off, especially a runner.
The runner doesn’t let anything slow she or he down. Be it the extremes of driving snow, sleet, rain, or overwhelming humidity-The runner can be spotted dodging snowflakes and raindrops for the love of logging their daily miles. No, the runner doesn’t often cut themselves any slack: including running when sick. But how do you know when you can sweat it out, and when you really should be calling it quits until you’re well again?

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Most experts recommend that you should follow the “above the neck rule”. Ailments that fall “below your neck” like a chest cold, body aches, flu like symptoms, and bronchitis are things you should take some time off for. Symptoms “above the neck” such as a runny nose, head cold, and stuffiness are pretty crappy things to have BUT the good news is that running with them won’t make you sicker.

Another important ailment to pay attention to is your temperature. If you have a fever and attempt to run, you increase your risk of turning your cold into the flu, or even something worse. Take your temp before lacing up-anything above 99 should stop you in your tracks. Laying low until the symptoms fade away will keep you from making yourself worse, or even bringing on a brand new illness!

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Running while sick is similar to running with an injury: it means that you still have to tread cautiously to take care of yourself. If you are running at a hard effort rather than taking it easy- you might just make yourself worse. Listening to your own body is the key.

I only had a head cold this week but opted to take some time off from running. In the past, I have pushed my own limits, no matter how sick I’m feeling. So of course, this only makes me even more sick. Cheers to learning from our own past mistakes!! If I had run Manchester this morning, I could have really put myself in danger to turn my cold into something worse. We all know that running a marathon running a marathon takes a toll on your entire body-never mind running it when you’re sick! I’m glad I listened to my own body this time around!

Take care of yourself, especially in these upcoming colder months!
Ps…It is currently snowing outside my window….WAHHHH!!! I’m not ready!!

Run Free, Run Strong,
Nicole

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