To get new shoes, or not: how do I know when to change them?

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Every body needs a day off from running, and today is mine 🙂 I don’t know if most runners are like me, but I truly dislike taking a day off from running. I know it will be good for me to refresh my muscles today as I plan on doing my long run of 20 miles tomorrow.

Today I am going to enjoy the beautiful sunshine, and take myself to a lovely (FREE) local park called Benson’s Wild Animal Farm in Hudson, NH. It used to be a private amusement park and zoo, but has been shut down since 1987. In 2010 it was reopened for recreational use. While there is no longer wildlife, Benson’s now features a bunch of gorgeous walking paths, beautiful gardens and lush green grass that you can sprawl out on to enjoy picnics. And lovely novels.

Tomorrow is an awesome day to me- its new shoe day! Boy, do I need this new pair! One of the most frequently asked questions for me by a new runner is “how often should I replace my running sneakers?” It ranges from 300-500 miles, and while every runner is different, the way you feel after your run is an indicator. Are you extra sore? Do you feel aches and pains that aren’t consistent with your after run stiffness? For me, the backs of my knees and my lower back start to tweak. Sometimes I even feel pain in the soles of my feet during my run-this is not a good sign!

Typically, you would want to purchase a new pair of kicks before your current pair gives out. This will give you time to transition from one pair to another without an awkward break in period for the new shoes. I unfortunately did not take my own good advice and will be launching full steam into my new shoes. Why did I wait? I wanted to hit a good sale in my favorite shoes! And I did! My Brooks Ghost 5 debuted at a price of $110, but are now on sale for $72 at
http://www.brooksrunning.com/Brooks-Ghost-5-Womens-Running-Shoe/120113,default,pd.html

Being properly fit for your shoes is also a big deal. If you’re in the wrong shoe, or the incorrect size it can be quite serious for your body. Shoes that are too tight on your foot or too small of a size will give you blisters and the dreaded black toenail. Nobody likes those painful black blisters on their little feet! Gait analysis also comes into play when searching for your best fit. As Goldilocks would say “it should be just right!” Every runner is different: pronation, height, weight, and mileage are all things to be take into consideration when searching for your new shoe.

To be properly fit for a new able,or to have your gait analyzed, you can head to your local running store. In my community, I have about three of them, and of course, I have a favorite- Marx Running and Fitness out of Acton, MA. The owner really knows his stuff and is quite the accomplished athlete. Over the years, he has fit me numerous times for shoes and every single time he has been right on the money!

How about you? How are you enjoying this lovely summertime weather? How often do you replace your running sneakers?

Thanks for reading! Run Free, Run Strong!
The Girl Who Ran Everywhere

Some great web articles on replacing your shoes:
http://www.runnersworld.com/running-shoes/running-shoe-faq?page=single
http://running.about.com/od/runningshoereviews/tp/replacerunningshoes.htm

My favorite running store: http://marxrunning.com/

My new shoes: http://www.brooksrunning.com/Brooks-Ghost-5-Womens-Running-Shoe/120113,default,pd.html

For more on Benson’s: http://www.bensonsanimalfarm.com/

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One thought on “To get new shoes, or not: how do I know when to change them?

  1. Pingback: Do I really need new running shoes? | Rob's Surf Report

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